light_square

Our vision is to provide an exceptional level of care to children and young people in a warm and friendly environment whilst promoting independence, choice and happiness - valuing individual uniqueness and diversity

Safer Recruitment Policy

Procedures for Safer Recruitment

New guidance came into force on 1st January 2007 replacing all previous guidance.  It is a huge and very prescriptive document that addresses a number of key areas:

  • sets out safeguarding responsibilities for local authorities, schools and FE colleges
  • extends child protection considerations to include pupil health and safety, bullying, arranging to meet the medical needs of children and medical conditions, providing first aid, school security and drug and substance misuse
  • provides recruitment safe practice for those who supply staff as well as LA, schools and FE colleges (way beyond having trained staff on any interviewing panel)
  • allegations against staff within the school setting

The Beeches follows the guidance as set out in this document as a basis for this policy. This procedure organises the minimum requirements of the selection and recruitment requirements into a self-assessment tool for the school which must be applied whenever a new appointment of any staff or volunteer is made in school.

Recruitment and selection self-assessment checklist

Planning

Timetable decided: job specification and description and other documents to be provided to applicants reviewed and updated as necessary. Application form seeks all relevant information and includes relevant statements about references etc.

The recruitment and selection policy statement should be included in:

  • Publicity materials
  • Recruitment websites
  • Advertisements
  • Candidate information packs
  • Person specifications
  • Job descriptions
  • Competency frameworks
  • Induction training

It is important to be clear about what mix of qualities, qualifications and experience a successful candidate will need to demonstrate, and whether there are any particular matters that need to be mentioned in the advertisement for the post in order to prevent unwanted applications.  It is essential to plan the recruitment exercise itself, identifying who should be involved, assigning responsibilities, and setting aside sufficient time for the work needed at each stage so that safeguards are not skimped or overlooked.  For example, it is important to organise the selection process to allow references to be obtained on shortlisted candidates before interview.

The person specification will need careful thought and drafting.  It is also good practice to make sure at the outset that all the other material, e.g. the application form, job description, and information or guidance for applicants that will form part of the candidate information pack is up-to-date, and clearly sets out the extent of the relationships and contact with children, and the degree of responsibility for children that the person will have in the position to be filled.  N.B. all work in a school, FE college or similar setting involves some degree of responsibility for safeguarding children, although the extent of that responsibility will vary according to the nature of the post.

The time and effort spent in this stage of the process should help minimise the risk of making an unsuitable appointment.

Application form

Employers should use an application form to obtain a common set of core data from all applicants.  It is not good practice to accept curriculum vitae drawn up by applicants in place of an application form because these will only contain the information the applicant wishes to present and may omit relevant details.

For applications for all types of post the form should obtain:

  • full identifying details of the applicant including current and former names, date of birth, current address, and Nation Insurance number;
  • a statement of any academic and/or vocational qualifications the applicant has obtained that are relevant to the position for which s/he is applying with details of the awarding body and date of the award;
  • a full history in chronological order since leaving secondary education, including periods of any post-secondary education or training, and part-time and voluntary work as well as full-time employment, with start and end dates, explanations for periods not in employment, education or training, and reasons for leaving employment;
  • a declaration of any family or close relationship to existing employees or employers (including councillors and governors);
  • details of referees. One referee should be the applicant’s current or most recent employer, and normally two referees should be sufficient.  B. where an applicant who is not currently working with children has done so in the past it is important that a reference is also obtained from the employer by whom the person was most recently employed in work with children.  The form should make it clear that references will not be accepted from relatives or from people writing solely in the capacity of friends; and
  • a statement of the personal qualities and experience that the applicant believes are relevant to his or her suitability for the post advertised and how s/he meets the person specification.

The application form should include an explanation that the post is exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and therefore that all convictions, cautions and bind-overs, including those regarded as ‘spent’, must be declared.  And it should require a signed statement that the person is not on List 99, disqualified from work with children, or subject to sanctions imposed by a regulatory body, e.g. the General Teaching Council (GTC), and either has no convictions, cautions, or bind-overs, or has attached details of their record in a sealed envelope marked confidential.

It should record that:

  • where appropriate the successful applicant will be required to provide a CRB Disclosure at the appropriate level for the post;
  • the prospective employer will seek references on short-listed candidates, and may approach previous employers for information to verify particular experience or qualifications, before interview;
  • if the applicant is currently working with children, on either a paid or voluntary basis, his or her current employer with children will be asked about disciplinary offences relating to children, including any in which the penalty is time expired (that is where a warning could no longer be taken into account in any new disciplinary hearing for example) and whether the applicant  has been the subject of any child protection concerns, and if so, the outcome of any enquiry or disciplinary procedure.  If the applicant is not currently working with children but has done so in the past, that previous employer will be asked about those issues; and
  • providing false information is an offence and could result in the application being rejected, or summary dismissal if the applicant has been selected and possible referral to the police.

Applicants for teaching posts should also be asked:

  • to provide their DfES reference number;
  • whether she/he has Qualified Teacher status (QTS); and
  • whether she/he is registered with the GTC for England.

Job Description

This should clearly state:

  • the main duties and responsibilities of the post; and
  • the individual’s responsibility for promoting and safeguarding the welfare of children and young persons s/he is responsible for, or comes into contact with.

All work in a school or similar setting involves some degree of responsibility for safeguarding children, although the extent of that responsibility will vary according to the nature of the post.

Person specification

This should:

  • included the qualifications and experience, and any other requirements needed to perform the role in relation to working with children and young people;
  • describe the competences and qualities that the successful candidate should be able to demonstrate;
  • explain how these requirements will be tested and assessed during the selection process. For example:

“In addition to candidates’ ability to perform the duties of the post, the interview will also explore issues relating to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children including:

  • motivation to work with children and young people;
  • ability to form and maintain appropriate relationships and personal boundaries with children and young people;
  • emotional resilience in working with challenging behaviours; and
  • attitudes to use of authority and maintaining discipline;” and
  • explain that if the applicant is short listed any relevant issues arising from his or her references will be taken up at interview.

Candidate Information Pack

The pack should include a copy of:

  • the application form, and explanatory notes about completing the form;
  • the job description and person specification;
  • any relevant information about the local authority or establishment and the recruitment process, and statements of relevant policies such as the authority or establishment’s policy about equal opportunities, the recruitment of ex-offenders, etc;
  • the establishment’s Child Protection Policy Statement; and
  • a statement of the terms and conditions relating to the post.

Vacancy advertised

Advertisements will include reference to safeguarding policy, i.e. statement of commitment to safeguarding and promoting welfare of children, and need for successful applicant to be CRB checked.

The employer should have an explicit written recruitment and selection policy statement and procedures that comply with national and local guidance.  The statement should detail all aspects of the process and should link to their child protection policy and procedures.

The policy statement should incorporate an explicit statement about the organisation’s commitment to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children.  An appropriate statement should be included in any model recruitment and selection policy that a local authority or HR adviser provides to establishments.  For example:

“This school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment.”

When a vacancy is advertised, the advertisement should also include reference to the need for the successful applicant to undertake an Enhanced Disclosure via the CRB, where appropriate, as well as the usual details of the post and salary, qualifications required, etc.

Applications on receipt

Application should be scrutinised – any discrepancies/anomalies/gaps in employment noted to explore if candidate should be considered for short listing.

Scrutinising and Short Listing

All applications should be scrutinised to ensure that they are: fully and properly completed; that the information provided is consistent and does not contain any discrepancies; and to identify any gaps in employment.  Incomplete applications should not be accepted and should be returned for completion.  Any anomalies or discrepancies or gaps in employment identified by the scrutiny should be noted so that they can be taken up as part of the consideration of whether to short list the application.

As well as reasons for obvious gaps in employment, the reasons for a history of repeated changes of employment, without any clear career or salary progression, or a mid-career move from a permanent post to supply teaching or temporary work, also need to be explored and verified.

All candidates should be assessed equally against the criteria contained in the person specification without exception or variation.

Checks Before interview

If a short list applicant claims to have some specific qualification or previous experience that is particularly relevant to the post for which s/he is applying that will not be verified by a reference, it is good practice to verify the facts before interview so that any discrepancy can be explored at interview.  The qualification or experience can usually be verified quickly by telephoning the relevant previous employer and asking for written confirmation of the facts.

Shortlist prepared

Seeking References

These should be sought directly from referee on short listed candidates:

  • ask specific recommended questions
  • include statement about liability for accuracy.

References

The purpose of seeking references is to obtain objective and factual information to support appointment decisions.  They should always be sought and obtained directly from the referee.  Employers should not rely on references or testimonials provided by the candidate, or on open references and testimonials, i.e. “To Whom it May Concern” as there have been instances of candidates forging such references. Open references or testimonials may be the result of a compromise agreement and are unlikely to include any adverse comments.

Professionals and Character References

Ideally, references should be sought on all short listed candidates, including internal ones, and should be obtained before interview so that any issues of concern they raise can be explored further with the referee, and taken up with the candidate at interview.  In exceptional circumstances it might not be possible to obtain references prior to the interview, either because of delay on the part of the referee, or because a candidate strongly objects to their current employer being approached at that stage, but that should be the aim in all cases.  It is up to the person conducting the recruitment to decide whether to accede to a candidate’s request to approach his or her current employer only if s/he is the preferred candidate after the interview, but it is not recommended as good practice.

All requests for references should seek objective verifiable information and not subjective opinion.  The use of reference pro formas can help achieve that.  A copy of the job description and person specification for the post for which the person is applying should be included with all requests, and every request should ask:

  • about the referee’s relationship with the candidate, e.g. did they have a working relationship: if so what; how long has the referee known the candidate, and in what capacity;
  • whether the referee is satisfied that the person has the ability and is suitable to undertake the job in question, and for specific comments about the applicant’s suitability for the post, and how s/he has demonstrated that s/he meets the person specification;
  • whether the referee is completely satisfied that the candidate is suitable to work with children, and, if not, for specific details of the referee’s concerns and reasons why the referee believes the person might be unsuitable;

and should remind the referee that:

  • they have a responsibility to ensure that the reference is accurate and does not contain any material misstatements or omission and
  • relevant factual content of the reference may be discussed with the applicant.

In addition to the above, requests addressed to a candidate’s current or previous employer in work with children should also seek:

  • confirmation of details of the applicant’s current post, salary, and sick record;
  • specific verifiable comments about the applicants performance history and conduct;
  • details of any disciplinary procedures the applicant has been subject to in which the disciplinary sanction is current;
  • details of any disciplinary procedures the applicant has been subject to involving issues related to the safety and welfare of children or young people, including any in which the disciplinary sanction has expired, and the outcome of those; and
  • details of any allegations or concerns that have been raised about the applicant that relate to the safety and welfare of children or young people or behaviour towards children or young people, and the outcome of those concerns e.g. whether the allegations or concerns were investigated, the conclusion reached, and how the matter was resolved.

References – on receipt

These should be checked against information on application; scrutinised; any

discrepancy/ issue of concern noted to take up with applicant (at interview if possible).

On receipt references should be checked to ensure that all specific questions have been answered satisfactorily.  If all questions have not been answered or the reference is vague or unspecific, the referee should be contacted and asked to provide written answers or amplification as appropriate.  The information given should also be compared with the application form to ensure that the information provided about the candidate and his or her previous employment by the referee is consistent with the information provided by the applicant on the form.  Any discrepancy in the information should be taken up with the applicant.

Any information about past disciplinary action or allegations should be considered in the circumstances of the individual case.  Cases in which an issue was satisfactorily resolve some time ago, or an allegation was determined to be unfounded or did not require formal disciplinary sanctions, and in which no further issues have been raised, are not likely to cause concern.  More serious or recent concerns or issues that were not resolved satisfactorily are more likely to cause concern.  A history of repeated concerns or allegations over time is also likely to give cause for concern.

Invitation to interview

In addition to the arrangements for interviews – time and place, directions to the venue, membership of the interview panel – the invitation should remind candidates about how the interview will be conducted and the areas it will explore including suitability to work with children.  Enclosing a copy of the person specification can usefully draw attention to the relevant information.

The invitation should also stress that the identity of the successful candidate will need to be checked thoroughly to ensure the person is who he or she claims to be, and that where a CRB Disclosure is appropriate the person will be required to complete an application for a CRB Disclosure straight away.  Consequently all candidates should be instructed to bring with them documentary evidence of their identity that will satisfy CRB requirements, i.e. either a current driving licence or passport including a photograph, or a full birth certificate, plus a document such as a utility bill or financial statement that shows the candidate’s current name and address, and where appropriate change of name documentation.

Candidates should also be asked to bring documents confirming any educational and professional qualifications that are necessary or relevant for the post, e.g. the original or a certified copy of a certificate, or diploma, or a letter of confirmation from the awarding body.  N.B. if the successful candidate cannot produce original documents or certified copies written confirmation of his or her relevant qualifications must be obtained from the awarding body.

A copy of the documents used to verify the successful candidate’s identity and qualifications must be kept for the personnel file.

Interview arrangements

Interview panel

It is better to have a minimum of two interviewers, and in some cases, e.g. for senior or specialist posts, a larger panel might be appropriate.  A panel of at least two people allows one member to observe and assess the candidate, and make notes, while the candidate is talking to the other.  It also reduces the possibility of any disputes about what was said or asked during the interview.

The members of the panel should:

  • have the necessary authority to make decisions about appointment
  • be appropriately trained
  • meet before the interviews to:
  • reach a consensus about the required standard for the job to which they are appointing;
  • consider the issues to be explored with each candidate and who on the panel will ask abut each of those; and
  • agree their assessment criteria in accordance with the person specification

The panel must agree in advance a list of questions for each candidate that they will not deviate from, but they should agree a set of questions they will ask all candidates relating to the requirements of the post, and the issues they will explore with each candidate based on the information provided in the candidate’s application and references (if available).  A candidate’s response to a question about an issue will determine whether and how that is followed up.  Where possible it is best to avoid hypothetical questions because they allow theoretical answers. It is better to ask competence based questions that ask a candidate to relate how she/he has responded to, or dealt with, an actual situation, or questions that test a candidate’s attitudes and understanding of issues.

Interview

Explores applicants’ suitability for work with children as well as for the post.

Scope of the interview

In addition to assessing and evaluating the applicant’s suitability for the particular post, the interview panel should also explore:

  • the candidate’s attitude towards children and young people;
  • his or her ability to support the authority or establishment’s agenda for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children;
  • gaps in the candidate’s employment history; and
  • concerns or discrepancies arising from the information provided by the candidate and/or a referee.

 

The panel should also ask the candidate if they wish to declare anything in light of the requirement for a CRB Disclosure.

If, for whatever reason, references are not obtained before the interview, the candidate should also be asked at interview if there is anything s/he wishes o declare or discuss in light of the questions that have been (or will be) put to his or her referees.  It is vital that the references are obtained and scrutinised before a person’s appointment is confirmed and before s/he starts work.

The interviewing panel should also stress that the identity of the successful candidate will need to be checked thoroughly to ensure the person is who he or she claims to be, and that where a CRB Disclosure is appropriate the person will be required to complete an application for a CRB Disclosure straight away. All candidates should have been instructed to bring with them documentary evidence of their identity that will satisfy CRB requirements, i.e. either a current driving licence or passport including a photograph, or a full birth certificate, plus a document such as a utility bill or financial statement that shows the candidate’s current name and address, and where appropriate change of name documentation.

Candidates should also have been asked to bring documents confirming any educational and professional qualifications that are necessary or relevant for the post, e.g. the original or a certified copy of a certificate, or diploma, or a letter of confirmation from the awarding body. N.B. if the successful candidate cannot produce original documents or certified copies written confirmation of his or her relevant qualifications must be obtained from the awarding body.

N.B. The identity and qualifications of successful applicant to be verified on day of interview by scrutiny of appropriate original documents. Copies of all documents will be taken and placed on file. Successful applicant will also complete application for CRB Disclosure on the day of interview.

Conditional offer of appointment: pre appointment checks

Any offer of appointment is made conditional on the satisfactory completion of the following pre-appointment checks and for non-teaching posts a probationary period.

Conditional Offer of Appointment:  Pre-Appointment Checks

An offer of appointment to the successful candidate should be conditional upon:

  • the receipt of at least two satisfactory references (if those have not already been received
  • verification of the candidate’s identity (if that could not be verified straight after the interview);
  • a check of DfES list 99 (in some residential establishments a check of the PoCA list may also be required) and, where appropriate, a satisfactory CRB Disclosure;
  • verification of the candidate’s medical fitness;
  • verification of qualifications (if not verified after the interview);
  • verification of professional status where required e.g. GTC registration, QTS status (unless properly exempted), NPQH;
  • (for teaching posts) verification of successful completion of statutory induction period (applies to those who obtained QTS after 7 May 1999); and
  • (for non teaching posts) satisfactory completion of the probationary period.

The authority or establishment should seek advice from its HR or personnel services provider, and follow relevant CRB guidance if a Disclosure reveals information that a candidate has not disclosed in course of the selection process.

All checks should be:

  • confirmed in writing;
  • documented and retained on the personnel file (subject to relevant advice contained in the CRB Code of Practice and the organisation’s own data protection arrangements); and
  • followed up where they are unsatisfactory or there are discrepancies in the information provided.

Where:

  • the candidate is found to be on List 99 or the PoCA list, or the CRB Disclosure shows s/he has been disqualified from working with children by a Court; or
  • an application has provided false information in, or in support of, his or her application; or
  • there are serious concerns about an applicant’s suitability to work with children, the facts must be reported to the police and/or the DfES Children’s Safeguarding Operations Unit (formerly the Teachers Misconduct Team).

List 99/PoCA List/CRB Disclosures on Overseas Candidates

List 99, and CRB Disclosures and where appropriate PoCA List checks must be completed on overseas staff.  In addition, criminal records information should be sought from countries where individuals have worked or lived.  Chapter 4 provides detailed guidance on these checks.

Identity

(If that could not be verified straight after the

interview)

Identity

It is important to be sure that the person is who he or she claims to be. The employer must ask to see proof of identity such as a birth certificate, driving licence, or passport combined with evidence of address, before an appointment is made.  Some form of photographic identity should be seen except where for exceptional reasons none is available.  Please note that proof of identity is required in connection with an application for a CRB Disclosure.  In summary, the proof should include name, date of birth, address and photographic identity.

Qualifications

(If not verified on the day of interview)

Qualification Requirements

Employers must always verify that the candidate has actually obtained any qualifications legally required for the job and claimed in their application e.g. by asking to see the relevant certificate or diploma, or a letter of confirmation from the awarding institution.  If original documents are not available, employers should see a properly certified copy.

Permission to work in UK

 If required

Staff who have lived outside the United Kingdom

Newly appointed staff who have lived outside the United Kingdom must undergo the same checks as for all other staff in schools and FE colleges.  This includes a CRB Disclosure and List 99 check.  In addition, employers must make such further checks as they consider appropriate due to the person having lived outside the United Kingdom, taking account of this guidance.  These further checks must be completed prior to an individual starting work.

CRB – Where appropriate satisfactory CRB Disclosure received

CRB Disclosures

The following are examples of positions which are exempted from the provisions of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, and individuals must be asked by employers to declare any convictions, cautions or reprimands, warnings or bind-overs which they have incurred, including any that would be regarded as ‘spent’ under the Act in other circumstances.  If a person is subsequently selected for appointment for such a position, the employer must ask them to apply to the CRB for a CRB Enhanced Disclosure to verify their declaration (see Appendix 9 for further information about the CRB Disclosure service):

  • any work in a school; or
  • any position involving unsupervised contact with a child under arrangements made by the child’s parents or guardian, the child’s school or a registered day care provider; or
  • a position as a governor of a school, FE college, including sixth form college, which involves regular work in the presence of, or care for, children, or training, supervising or being in sole charge of children; or
  • any position in which the normal duties include providing education and regularly caring for, training, supervising or being in sole charge of children or young people under the age of 18 in an FE college including sixth form colleges.

The School Staffing (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2006 and the intended School Staffing (England) (Amendment) (No 2) Regulations 2006 make it mandatory for CRB Enhanced Disclosures to be obtained on all newly appointed school staff.  The intended Further Education (Providers of Education) (England) Regulations 2006 make CRB Enhanced Disclosures mandatory  for those of the FE workforce who provide education and have regular care for, train, supervise, or have sole charge of persons aged under 18.  In the case of schools, this includes those who do not work directly with children, for example admin staff, caretakers and other ancillary staff.  By newly appointed we mean anyone who within the three months before his or her appointment has not worked in:

  • a school in a post in a school England which brought him or her into regular contact with children or any post they were appointed to since 12 May 2006; or
  • an FE college and the new appointment will be one providing education and regularly caring for, training, supervising, or being in sole charge of children or young people under the age of 18.

Guidance on obtaining and dealing with CRB Disclosures is at Appendix 9

CRB Disclosures and Existing Staff

Schools, FE colleges or local authorities are not required to ask existing staff, in post, who were not previously eligible (including those recruited before the establishment of the CRB) for criminal background checks to apply for a CRB Disclosure, unless

  • they have concerns about the person’s suitability to work with children; or
  • an individual moves to work that involves greater contact with children and their previous work did not require a CRB Enhanced Disclosure.

A key exception of this is set out in – checks on overseas staff.

CRB Disclosures when someone moves School, Local Authority or FE College

A new CRB Disclosure is not required when someone moves school, local authority or FE College.  A new CRB Disclosure is only required if an individual has not worked in:

  • a school in post which brought him or her into regular contact with children or any post since 12 may 2006; or
  • an FE college within the three months before his or her appointment, and the new appointment will be one providing education and regularly caring for, training, or being in sole charge of children or young people under the age of 18.

However, employers are reminded that they must ensure that all the other recommended and mandatory pre-recruitment checks are carried out, including List 99.

LIST 99 – person is not prohibited from taking up the post

List 99

List 99 checks must be undertaken for all school staff including local authority employed school staff, and staff providing education in FE colleges before they begin work.  List 99 checks are usually completed as part of the CRB Enhanced Disclosure.  It is important when completing a CRB Disclosure request that the relevant statement is ticked on the Disclosure form confirming that employment involves working with children.  When a person applies for a CRB Disclosure to verify their suitability to work with children the Disclosure will contain details of whether they are included on List 99 and/or the Protection of Children Act (PoCA) List.  A separate list 99 check will not be required unless the CRB Disclosure remains outstanding at the time the individual begins work.

Health – the candidate is medically fit

Health

Anyone appointed to a post involving regular contact with children or young people must be medically fit (see the Education (Health Standards) (England) Regulations 2003).  It is the statutory responsibility of employers to satisfy themselves that individuals have the appropriate level of physical and mental fitness before an appointment offer is confirmed.  Circular 4/99 relating to medical fitness is in the process of being updated and the revised version will provide more detailed guidance and contact information.

GTC England – (for teaching posts in maintained schools and non-maintained special schools) the teacher is registered with the GTC or exempt from registration

Additional Checks on Those Applying For Teaching Posts in Schools

All teachers working in teaching posts in maintained schools, non-maintained special schools and pupil referral units in England must register with the General Teaching Council for England (GTC), unless they are exempt from the requirements to hold Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).  Employers must check with the GTC whether teachers applying for positions in such schools are registered with the Council, whether any GTC restrictions are in force against the teacher, and, where appropriate, whether they have Qualified Teacher Status and have completed their induction period.  Local authorities can do this on-line; schools which are employers can all the employer access line on 0870 001 4823.

With effect from 31 March 2012 the GTC will cease to operate and on April 1 2012 a new executive agency of the Department for Education (DfE) – the Teaching Agency- will be responsible for:

  • Maintaining a database of who has been awarded QTS
  • Maintaining a list of those prohibited from teaching
  • Making this information available to employers.

QTS – (for teaching posts in maintained schools the teacher has obtained QTS or is exempt from the requirement to hold QTS (for teaching posts in FE colleges the teacher has obtained a Post Graduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) or Certificate of Education (Cert. Ed) awarded by a Higher Education Institute (HEI), or the FE Teaching Certificate conferred by an Awarding

Body

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)

No person may teach in a maintained school or non-maintained special school unless she/he:

  • has qualified teacher status (QTS), otherwise known as a ‘qualified teacher’; or
  • falls within one of the special categories specified in the Education (Specified Work and Registration) (England) Regulations 2003 (S.I. No.1663).

Statutory induction

Post Appointment:  Induction

There should be an induction programme for all staff and volunteers newly appointed in an establishment, including teaching staff, regardless of previous experience.  In the case of teaching and learning support staff this will be implemented and overseen by the Headteacher. The purpose of induction is to:

  • provide training and information about the establishment’s policies and procedures;
  • support individuals in a way that is appropriate for the role for which they have been engaged;
  • confirm the conduct expected of staff within the school
  • provide opportunities for a new member of staff or volunteer to discuss any issues or concerns about their role or responsibilities; and
  • enable the person’s line manager or mentor to recognise any concerns or issues about the person’s ability or suitability at the outset and address them immediately.

The content and nature of the induction process will vary according to the role and previous experience of the new member of staff or volunteer, but as far as safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is concerned the induction programme should include information about, and written statements of:

  • policies and procedures in relation to safeguarding and promoting welfare e.g. child protection, anti-bullying, anti-racism, physical intervention or restraint, intimate care, internet safety and any local child protection and safeguarding procedures;
  • safe practice and the standards of conduct and behaviour expected of staff and pupils in the establishment;
  • how and with whom any concerns about those issues should be raised; and
  • other relevant personnel procedures e.g. disciplinary, capability and whistle-blowing.

The programme should also include attendance at child protection training appropriate to the person’s role.

March 2012